Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

Eagle Owl; Undisclosed Site; 8th April 2015

First located after the bird called three times before sunset, I was delighted to finally get the bird out in view in something approaching daylight...


The bird remained on the same perch for almost an hour as darkness fell and gave me crippling views and on of the best birding experiences of my lifetime. What a superb bird...





As darkness fell the bird became gradually more active...





A wing stretch for the camera...

A stunning evening with an incredible male Eagle Owl! love the years I have visited this site many, many times, often hearing the male display in spring, indeed often seeing the birds after darkness fell. One evening two years ago, John Costello and I had the male displaying just before dusk in good light and that planted the seed. Since that wonderful evening, I have had it at the back of my mind that this was one bird I really ought to make a big effort to videoscope and sound record if i could only get lucky enough to locate the bird before it was too dark. I had already done four trips this spring, with just a single calling bird to my credit this year. It was a nice evening and it was a somewhat impulsive decision to get out and have a look. I arrived in good light was was immediately met with three display hoots by the male bird. The calls came from a group of tall rees in the corner of the woodland and I didn't have to work hard at all to locate the bird as it was sitting out on an open perch, in full view! I could't believe my luck and quickly grabbed som photos as the bird proceeded to close its eyes and doze off...
 It soon became apparent the bird was not moving in the near future, over the following 70 minutes i was treated to nothing short of crippling views of one of Europe's most impressive birds. As darkness fell the bird began to get more active, looking around, wing stretching and scratching his head. Finally, he made my evening and broke into full display. I was delighted as I had my Telling Parabol set up along with the scope and camera and I was able to record all of this and get top quality audio externally. After a bit of displaying the bird floated up to the top of a nearby tree, looked around for a couple of minutes and flew right over my head. It continued to display in the darkness as I departed. This was a very special experience indeed and I felt fortunate to have witnessed such an incredible bird for such a prolonged period. The video, with externally recorded sound, has turned out really well and gives an idea of what a wonderful bird this is...


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