Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Saturday, June 01, 2013

River Warbler; Jägarkullen; Norra järvafältet; 1st June 2013

I awoke early this morning, dragged myself out of bed and freshened up before heading to Norra Järvafältet for a very special species, River Warbler. News broke during the week that a bird had been found on territory, not only that, it was giving incredible views as well. I really wanted to see this species, it's been about twenty years since I last had the species in my sights in Poland. In addition, it is a species I really have wanted to sound record for some time. I was a little later than I would of liked, which was unavoidable. Any fears I had that the bird might of ceased singing by 09.30am where allayed immediately on arrival, the bird was close to the top of the thicket of rosehip bushes, reeling it's song out. I quickly grabbed a few shots, before setting up the parobol and digital recorder. The bird was a star and I got a lovely recording, which I was delighted with...

 A stunning River Warbler in full song. A very special morning with an incredibly showy bird, normally not the easiest birds to photograph...

After recording the bird, I watched ot for a while, taking in its features. Though these may appear to some to be drab birds, I think they are superb. I love the sleek lines, postures and subtle features. I took in the long undertail coverts with diagnonic markings, the broad tail and full primary projection as the bird threw it's head back and sang it's guts out, a fantastic experience! The throat markings, long bill and pinkish bare parts were all noted, which is all easily seen on a singing bird right in front of one. I could only imagine how confusing this could be on some headland in western Ireland, given brief views of a skulking bird..

 The bird gave itself up for the camera, though I didnt stay close for more than a
minute or two, not that the bird minded at all. It completely ignored me and sang constantly...

 My first view of the bird, singing from a Rosehip thicket...

I watched the bird for about 90 minutes, moving in close just once when the light improved briefly for a few shots. The light was superb and it allowed my to get some amazing shots of a species which can be difficult to photograph.
 The song is quite incredible, happily I got an excellent recording which I can paste here for your enjoyment, dear readers! Sounds like and old sewing machine, a fabulous noise indeed...

 Some might think this a drab bird, but this family of warbler's, Locustella, are among the most enigmatic of songsters. They are long range migrants which are very skulking and elusive on migration. They are incredible songsters and their curious, reeling songs are generally delivered under the cover of darkness, though they also sing morning and evening. Little is known about many of the genus, which includes some of europe's most sought after species.

Note here the detail on the throat, not unlike Thrush Nightingale. Also here, a superb view of the undertail covert's...

Here is this mornings sound recording, just click on play to listen to the bird in display...


1 comment:

Ars Natura said...

Grattis! Jag ska se om jag kommer nära ser jag det en dag, kanske i morgon.