Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Pipit call from Landsort; 22nd October 2012; Tree Pipit or Olive backed Pipit?




Been analyzing my recordings from Landsort tonight, just came across this call. This was not picked up in the field, though the telinga has picked up what is clearly a buzz type flight call of a pipit. The question is, which one? It is clearly not a Red throated Pipit, the two remaining candidates are Tree Pipit and Olive backed Pipit. If it is the latter, it is a very late individual. The latter is very rare, though has occured on Landsort previously. There is a large influx into western europe right now...

Personally, to my ear, the bird sounds like a Tree Pipit, albeit a late bird. A noteworthy record all the same.

Edit; Having done some research and examined the sonogram in particular, I was quite sure that this is indeed a Tree Pipit. The sonagram clearly shows the call in the 5-6 decibel range, a match for Tree Pipit. The call of Olive backed Pipit is of a higher pitch and registers around 8 decibels on a sonogram. Futher assistance was kindly provided by Jelmer Poelstra, to whom I am vary grateful for taking the time to analyse the recorded call. Below are some boxplots which show the call is indeed that of Tree Pipit...


Above; Boxplots of the Landsort recording, showing the call falls within the range of that given by Tree Pipit...

Many thanks to Jelmer Poelstra for providing these superb plots...





2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Incredible at this time of year & with the current influx of OBPs, but yes, looks more like a Tree Pipit, mainly because of the low highest frequency and the shallow slope of the call. (Though the apparent lack of a downward modulation at the end of the call does fit a bit better for OBP.)
You can email me for a few plots of the recording compared to other TPS and OBPs (jelmerpoelstra at gmail.com).

Alan Dalton said...

Hi Jelmer,
Thanks for the help with this bird. Hope you are enjoying the recordings. Have amplified the latest posts as you suggested, very helpful, thank you..