Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Sunday, August 05, 2012

1st calender Lesser Black-backed Gulls; Skeppsbron; 5th August 2012

 Bird A. This Lesser black Backed Gull was rather cooperative and was quickly picked out from amon the argentatus flock. Note the relatively pale head, solid dark centres to the upperwing feathers and the long primary projection. Note the solidly dark tertial centres with even, creamy white fringes at the tips.


 Bird A. Another good shot showing the upperparts. In adition to the features pointed out above, note here the lack of any pale tips to the primaries and the solid, dark centres on the innermost greater covert's, plainly visible here.In many ways this is a classic 'baltic' type to my eyes, approaching the paller end of the spectrum...


 Bird A. Upperwing in flight. Generally speaking rather dark in appearance on the upperwing. The greater covert's are very dark indeed, many birds are not so markedly dark here. There is no noticable pale inner primary window in flight, though on inspection some lighter grey can be made out on the inner web fro P7 inwards...


 Bird A. The uppertail here, the subterminal band narrowest toward the outertail, well demarciated on a rather white tail. Some well defined dark markings inside the tailband, though the inner tail is largely white...


 Bird A. Depending on the light, the general appearance can be less or more marked. Here strong sunlight tones dark values down, though here the tail is stil striking in appearance. This bird was appraoaching argentatus Herring Gull in size, a 1st calender here on the water in the back ground.


 Bird A. A nice shot of the underparts in neutral light. Note the dark markings on the underwing covert's. The tail pattern is apparent from the underside, whilst the flanks are spotted with dark markings...






 Bird B. Very similar to Bird A. Note the diffences in the tail pattern, more bold dark markings on the innertail and rump in particular. Close examination of the dark markings and their extremes on the outermost tail feathers help further to identify this as a second individual. Often with gulls, close inspection is required in this manner...


 Bird B. Broadly very much like Bird A. The birds bill was however a little lighter, though plumage was remarkably simular, so much so, in fact, that it would no surprise me to learn if these two birds were siblings...






 Bird C. This bird appeared only briefly. A noticably smaller, more delicately built bird than the nearby Argentatus, rather pale in appearance. I eventually tentatively put this one down as a 1st calender Lesser Black-backed Gull, but there are issues with it's appearance. The tail band appears a little less striking, though the innertail is largely white, essentially matching that of LBBG. The greater covert's are again a little light in tone, yet solidly centred towards the outerwing, and fall within the expected parameteres of LBBG. A pale primary window in undoubtedly there, more striking by far than the above two birds. It is in fact reminiscent of both Herring/Caspian Gull, though structure and plumage seem to point toward this bird belonging to the LBBG complex. Could this be an intermedius/graellsii LBBG? 




Bird C. Another excellent shot of this birds upperparts in flight, if a LBBG this bird is rather light toned. A nice view of the tail pattern here in this shot. The rather narrow subterminal band on the outermost tail feathers, is notable. Further observation of this bird would be welcome in order to put to bed nagging doubts as to it's identity..


Photos here of two  individual Lesser Black-backed Gulls from Skeppsbron earlier today, with another more perplexing individual discussed, the second candidate in a month in it's age group, a putatice intermedius/graellsii Lesser black-backed Gull.


No comments: