Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Sunday, April 01, 2012

Bird Recordings; Tyresta National Park; 1st April 2012


Out later today due to bad weather earlier on in the morning, as well as being curious to whether some different calls might be available in the evening. As it was there were lots of Song Thrush singing, as well as Blackbird. A fairly successful outing with some decent recordings made, some of which are here. conditions not ideal, a light wind and some drizzle earlier. Rain and electronics will not mix of course, so the parabol stayed in its case until it stopped. In general I find that, so far, recording is enough in itself and I just take the binoculars with me, though the camera could come if wanted. I find the light approach better, as often there are detours to get closer to sounds and less weight is useful.
   Still using the dish handheld, which allows greater mobility. It is difficult sometimes to avoid noise, the slightest movement of the hand, or breathing, cracking of joints and coughing will all be picked up and I find myself concentrating hard on being completely relaxed and silent. Soft fabrics on clothes are very important I am discovering! My waterproof, windproof jacket is great for general birding, but for recording a nightmare, due to the noise resulting from anf small friction or movement! As regards the equipment, I'm now comfortable with it and find it very easy to use, which is a real bonus whilst concentrating hard on what is calling of singing around me. I find the ease of pressing the record button on the front of the Marantz 661 a real boon, it being equally simple to stop recording. In time I can see these movements becoming more automatic as I become used to the gear.
   A few more species added today, a lovely recording of Song Thrush in particular. Also, a barking Red Fox was picked up distantly whilst recording a singing Blackbird! I would not of heard this without the dish. In the future the parabol should give me a huge advantage when monitoring diurnal and nocturnal migrants...



First up a very nice recording of a Song Thrush, surely among the most beautiful songs of any european species...





Here a very high call given from a Nuthatch. The bird was quite close to me in a spruce tree, initially the call confused me...



Here the familiar call of Mallard, these coming from male birds that were roosting on Flaten, one of the parks many lakes..




Here the call/song of Crested Tit. In the background a Common Buzzard can be heard calling...



Here a pair of Long-tailed Tits move around some willow bushes calling, close by. A nice recording with other species in the background, including Yellowhammer, Mallard and Blue Tit..



Another recording of the same two birds at close range, a reat recording opportunity. Blue Tit and Woodpigeon in the background...



Another predominent species here, Common Blackbird. A singing male here, though listen out for the bark of a Red Fox in the background!



The song of another common species here, a male Blue Tit. Had never heard the small sqeaky notes heard here after the song, perhaps subsong. Working with a parabol microphone gives new insight into even the commonest species..



Here a scolding Great Spotted Woodpecker gives 'kick' calls, perhaps in alarm, or perhaps a territorial dispute with another male..



At the wetland Ovre Kärret, male Goldeneye were agressively chasing a lone female around. The female called whilst being chased, here a recording of her calls...



Here the low courting calls of three male Goldeneye, aiming to impress the female. Remarkably here, the sniffing sounds are exhaling Whooper Swans! Also here are Woodpigeon and Great Spotted Woodpecker..


Here a Nuthatch singing, you can here a second bird in the background responding..


Here you can here mainly calling Chaffinch, though listen for the higher pitched calls of Hawfinch here, nice to get a recording of these today..


1 comment:

Jan's Travel and Tours said...

Nice records of that beautiful bird's songs, I'm glad you had able to got all that...keep on posting!