Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Saturday, March 10, 2012

Tyresta National Park; 10th March 2012

 A Goldeneye male on  open water at Lake Flaten in Tyresta National Park....

Tyresta National Park was the site today and I arrived at dawn. There was much activity straight away, common woodland species were everywhere. Almost straight away I heard a drumming woodpecker close by, and the tempo and slightly higher pitch told me it was a Lesser Spotted Woodpecker! This was my first of the year and I eventually got a view of it high up in the trees at it's drumming post. A few moments after getting the bird in view a second began drumming across the lake. I moved on, a pair of Goldeneye on the water along with Mallards. A highlight of the morning came in the flashing form of a huge 2nd calender Goshawk, certainly a female bird which tore across the lake and struck terror into the wildfowl. Onwards and there were Crested Tit everywhere, a single Willow Tit was better, then a singing Coal Tit.
 The morning was difficult due to ice on the tracks and I had to walk in the woods at times, or on a narrow verge of thawed ground. The ice was lethal and concentration had to be kept at all times to aviod a slip in so remote an area. A third Lesser Spotted Woodpecker further into the forest followed, before a pair of Goshawk were seen crossing a glade and into the forest from where they called. Bullfinch trumpets echoed through the mixed woodland, as did the raucous tones of Jays. Then the second yeartick of the day, a Skylark flew over calling, the first of two during the morning. A Black Woodpeckers powerful drumming was heard close by the road, later a female bird flew overhead calling. Despite the ice, this was a very enjoyable mornings birding. Still more surprises, two more Lesser Spotted Woodpecker were found feeding, a pair, the male showing really well and allowing a few photos in the improved light. Five birds in a day is quite remarkable by any standards and I had never seen more than a pair in a day previously...






 Lesser Spotted Woodpecker. A quite amazing day for these birds with no less than five birds seen! This male was quite showy, other males were high up in the trees drumming...

I carried on a more species were noted. Hawfinch were heard in a couple of areas where they seem to prefer, a flock of Long-tailed Tit bustled through the trees, a Wren 'tacked' from dense cover in low brush. A second Goshawk territory was located, I saw the male but only heard the female this time. Finally my long looping walk brough me back to the waterfalls at Nyfors were, as always, a pair of Dipper were busy feeding. One of the birds was quite cooperative today and I got quite close, a shame the light wasn't so good with overcast skies. That brought a lovely morning to an end, a respectable 33 species seen or heard throughout the outing...




Dipper; As always a pair at the falls. Always nice to see these birds...



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