Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Brambling; Ravalen; 25th January 2012

 The bird I went for today, a male Brambling. This bird has wintered here near the feeding station and I was happy when it appeared after about 20 minutes and began to feed. Always a nice bird to see well and very distinctive, both in voice and appearance...




 The bird feeding on seed with Yellowhammers. The birds right wing appears to be drooping down slightly, perhaps the reason it didn't migrate? This is a scarce species in midwinter here in Sweden..




 Bullfinch, a female bird approaches the feeding station. Six birds were present today at the site..




 A cock Bullfinch, a blaze of colour amid the other birds. Alway nice to see this wonderful finch, this is one site were they can be guaranteed in winter..




 Marsh Tit. Three birds at least visiting the site for food. Willow Tit does not use this feeding station as far as I know, though a few kilometres away another station does attract them. This bird here has a rather small bib, although is rather small headed. Always safest to distinguish the two species on call were possible...




The ubiquitous Yellowhammer, a very common species here in Sweden and very quick to take advantage of feeding stations...

A visit to Ravalen today, principally to see the Brambling that has been wintering at the site. On arrival it wasn't around, though there was plenty of activity in the area. 20 Yellowhammer, 3 Marsh Tit, 2 Tree Sparrow, 1 Robin and 6 Bullfinch were the best of it, amonst the Great Tit, Blue Tit, Nuthatch and Blackbirds also present. After 25 minutes I picked the Brambling up in cover, though eventually it showed very well indeed on the ground...

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