Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

Cape Clear Island; 4th October 2011

 Another day of tough weather on Cape, hounded by visibility problems here as mist rolls over the island  with little warning. Nevertheless a few brighter moments through the day..

Up at dawn again and out the door, first priority was an attempt to secure evidence to confirm the Blyth's Reed Warbler at Cotters Garden. Soon after arrival the bird was heard calling, just a bit after that we had the Reed Warbler calling at the same time as the suspected Blyth's from the opposite side of the garden. Views were not good though, neither bird showing well. We had a flight view of the target bird, again the tone noted as colourless in comparison to the Reed Warbler present. Attempts to see, photograph and net the bird all came to no avail before 2pm., frustratingly the bird was regularily heard calling from within the same area of Fushia right through this period. The Reed Warbler was trapped again.
 After lunch I again returned to Cotters where Steve decided to erect a 10 foot mist net along a favoured route of the bird and tape lure it. This also failed, the bird was much less active again today in the afternoon, though did call a few times. Eventually when Brian Haslam came into the garden to say there was a Wryneck at The Waist and we piled down there for a look...


 Hummingbird Hawkmoth, cracking moths these, I had four today...




Wryneck on Mc Carthy's patio, right in front of me, brilliant birds they are too...

After a search of the Nordy Wood, where the bird was last seen, I located the Wryneck beside Mc Carthy's sitting up on brambles. All present goot great views of this cracking bird, jst the tonic after the days frustrations in Cotters. The bird then moved about the waist before it went back to Mc Carthy's and I had it right in front of me on the outside patio, a stunning view. The bird then performed for all on the rocks over the waist, we really couldn't have asked for more...

 My first view of the bird on the brambles, a classic autumn rarity to liven any day..


 Perched in the waist...


 The bird performed for all on the rocks above the waist...

Fter that it was off the the Glenn, little out of the ordinary though. In South Harbour Gannets were feeding, always a sign of oncoming weather, there is in fact the tail in of Hurricane Ophelia comong over the next two days and it will hit Ireland directly, westerlies will follow after the worst has past. Wouldn't a yank or two be nice, here's hoping...I'll leave you with a few Robin shots!



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