Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Monday, June 27, 2011

Brilliant Emerald(Somatochlora metallica); Kungsängen; June 2011

 Brilliant Emerald in flight, delighted with the shots I got of these superb little odonata today, which I initially misidentified as Cordulia aenea. A new species for me....






 Another sharp shot. All taken with manual focus on the sigma 150mm.






 Head on, note the diagnostic facial pattern, the yellow spots on the frons forming a bar...






 A few of the shots into the sun were really overexposed, though sharp. I had increased the shutter speed by moving way back to f4 from f11, nearly deleted it, but now rather like it as an image...






 Another flight shot as it hunted right in front of me...




One more from the overexposed f4 camp....

At Kungsängen for a few hours before worked, lots of butterflies and odonata around which was the objective and I happened upon a tiny stream with two male Brilliant Emeralds (Somatochlora metallica)hunting along its tiny length. I spent an hour getting these shots, difficult with manual focus, but the results were great and I'm well chuffed to have flight images of these little crackers. Amazing to watch them feed, their eyesight is very acute as they can see very small flying insect from some range, often making sudden detours straight up in the air of up to ten metres. Initially I thought these to be Cordulia aenea, many thanks to Phil Benstead(http://birding-benstead.blogspot.com/) for alerting me to their correct identity and the fact that I had in fact just had a tick!


3 comments:

Phil Benstead said...

hi alan
great photos but they actually show Somatochlora metallica... Check out the facial markings. Hope it is a tick! cheers phil

wayne lowery said...

excellent shots alan

Alan Dalton said...

Thanks for that Phil, have checked it out and the face pattern is a giveaway, it's a tick alright!