Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Spring Birding; Tyresta N.P., 24th April 2011

 Brimstone Butterfly; very plentifull today...



 Bee Fly, Bombylius Major
 This large, squat hairy fly resembles a small bumble bee. It has long hairy legs, a very long, slender tongue and clear wings with a black band along their front edge. It is usually seen in early spring, hovering around flower borders and it takes an interest in both primroses and violets. The eggs are flicked towards the entrance of solitary bee nests.

The larvae are brood parasites in the nests of these bees and will be found where suitable areas for the nests of hosts coincide with woodlands, hedgerows or gardens rich in flowers. Adult flies feed on nectar, using their long proboscises whilst hovering beside a flower. Aubretia is one common garden plant frequently visited.


 Whooper Swan pair, the first time I have noticed a pale iris on these birds...



 Slavonian Grebes, a record shot of this breeding pair.



 Whooper Swans and Slavonian Grebes...



Wood Anenome; Woodland flowers are now appearing in the park adding a splash of ground colour....


A trip to Tyresta National Park today on easter Monday. The park was busy with a lot of people visiting, there were mountain biker's, hikers and sunbathers everywhere and not a lot was seen as a result. Entered the park at Nyfors and immediatly butterflies were noticeable, Brimstones were everywhere. I spent a while trying to get a shot of these, though it proved difficult on a very warm spring day. A bit of good fortune saw me stumble upon a butterfly tick, a stunning Green Hairstreak. I manage to lose it after trying to get a photo and I could not find it again, though I did have very good views of it. My first Orange Tip of the year flew past, then a Comma was seen flying overhead. Small Tortoiseshell and Peacock were also noted, as well as an arly fritillary, probably a Small Pale Bordered Fritlillary. A couple of small grey brown butterflies were seen amongst the trees overhead in one area, bad views left me stumped as to their identity...
 The birding was quite, though at a favourite small wetland area I located nesting pairs of Whooper Swan, Slavonian Grebe, Crane and Green Sandpiper. I enjoyed good views of the grebes nest building and feeding, very nice indeed, and a year tick too. A singing Chiffchaff was added to the yearlist at this point. Common birds were everywhere and at one point I heard Goshawk in what is surely a breeding area. I tried Lake Flaten last of all, alas no Black Throated Divers were present, a lot of human activity around the lake a bit worrying with regard to their breeding hopes. Last year kayaking and other disturbances on the lake meant the birds failed to breed successfully....

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