Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Thrush Nightingale; Sandemar; 11th-12th May 2010

Right in front of the hide in glorious light, feeding on the ground at first until it jumped up on this log for me. A breathtaking moment after 16 hours in a hide...



Feeding on the ground, again the bird jumped up onto a perch and allowed me this lovely shot. Had really wanted a good shot displaying the russet uppertail. By this stage the bird was oblivious to the hide and allowing me to get some great shots...

Early morning, the bird prepares to sing. It is quite incredible how many hours these birds sing their heart out, around the clock....


Right in front of the hide, eye level, banging out the decibels, brilliant! So often these shots were spoiled by a branch obscuring the bird, but not on this occasion...



Late evening, day one. A nice shot of the bird. I am sure he knew I was in the hide even after nine hours, it was only the following day that he ignored it's presence completely...



Day two was so much easier, with sunshining brightly and the bird occasionly showing right out in the open...



Singing overhead against a blue sky...



One more shot, the bird reacting to the shutter firing...



Thrush Nightingale. Secretive, skulking and impossible to photograph. This was a project of mine over the past week. Located this male a few days ago and decided to concentrate on it in order to try and get some decent photos af the species, which I have wanted to get for a few years. This year a long winter has meant a very late spring and as a result the foliage is only in bud now. The nightingales have arrived back to find very little cover on the breeding grounds as a result.
These photos are the results of two days sitting in a hide for almost nineteen hours. Most were taken on the second day after repositioning the hide the evening before. A rather gruelling couple of days, but very satisfying, I feel I have had a real glimpse into this species world. I never dreamed I would get the amount of photos I did, the bird was a star and allowed me to get some incredible shots of a very, very difficult species. Too many shots were taken to post together so I have added a new Thrush Nightingale gallery in the margin to the right where all of the better photos taken over the two days can be viewed as a slideshow...
An incredible songster, seem a shame you should all miss out on the aural pleasures of this bird, a little video footage here taken through the D90 in video mode will allow the song to be heard...

2 comments:

Julie G. said...

Wow! Congratulations on these outstanding images of a Thrush Nightingale! Your persistence paid off. A joy to visit your wonderful blog!

Sandra Palme said...

Brilliant!!!! :)